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Make. More. Money.

 

When I was offered $800 for a long article, I said, “I was thinking of something in four digits.” The editor said, “I’ll get back to you.”

A day later, I got the call: “We can’t do $1000. The most I can pay is $875.”

I said, “Sold.”

Now, $75 won’t make me rich. But $75 in my pocket is better than $75 in the publisher’s. And I made that happen in ten seconds and eight (8) words.

*****

Here’s how you can do it in one (1) word. Just say no.

“I can’t pay, but you’ll get plenty of exposure.” No.

“We pay $25 for 1,000 words.” No.

“You write it, we own the rights.” No.

*****

Here’s another make-more-money word: Instead of raising your rates, you’re changingthem. For more on this one-syllable substitution, read here.

*****

Seth Godin offers this phrase to change the hearts of tight-fisted clients:

You’ll pay a lot, but you’ll get more than you pay for. 

He says,“That’s as useful a freelancer marketing strategy as you can fit in a single sentence.”

*****

The Olders use a variation on that sentence. When told that an outlet can get a service way cheaper than our price, we say, “You pay peanuts, you get monkeys.”

*****

Effin and I were at a noisy product launch in San Francisco when the call came. A production studio wanted to use one of my minimovies for a new show on the History Channel.

To escape the noise, we stepped outside, me on my phone, Effin standing three feet away. All she could hear was my end of the conversation. It was short — went like this: “Two-hundred dollars? I was expecting twice that much.”

Then I went quiet.

A moment passed. Two.

Then the answer: “We can do $300 and no more.”

I said, “Sold.”

(As far as I can tell, that show never materialized, but the check did.)

Got your own Make More Money strategies? Send ‘em my way, and, unless you specify, I’ll try to share with the Lifeguards.

Jules

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They came to the tracks …

June 5, 1968. Robert F. Kennedy is assassinated.

June 8, 1968. The funeral train carrying RFK’s body begins its journey from New York City to Washington, D.C. On board the train is photojournalist Paul Fusco. But Fusco doesn’t take pictures on the train. He photographs the thousands of people who come to the tracks to say good-bye to Bobby.

SFMOMA’s exhibition, The Train, features photos from Fusco’s collection of images of individuals, families, and various groups of people who wave, cry and hold up signs of fondness and farewell.

Fusco’s often-times blurry photographs capture the movement of the train and the sorrowful mood of grieving Americans saying their last good-byes to Robert F. Kennedy.

The exhibition runs to June 10, 2018.

 

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The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, SFMOMA, is presenting Robert Rauschenberg, Erasing the Rules. Not only was Rauschenberg one of the leading lights of 20th century American art, he was — at least to me — the artist who changed art from A to B.

A is what you see on the canvas, the sculpture, the fresco.

B is what you don’t see, but you know or intuit lies beneath what you don’t see … because there’s not much there to see.

Rauschenberg’s “Erased de Kooning Drawing (1953)” is B’s exemplar. In a plain frame hangs what once was a sketch by William de Kooning. Line by line, Rauschenberg erased it. Though little more than a blank paper, it is among SFMOMA’s most treasured works. There’s nothing to see here, Folks!

You  can see (and not see) for yourself through March 25, 2018.

 

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That didn’t take long. On October 9, I made my first prediction of 2017. Here’s how it read:

Gun

I predict that on or before September 1, 2019, there will be more mass shootings on American soil. I further predict that the American government will do nothing of significance to curb this mayhem and loss of life. I further predict that the congressmen who took no action will be rewarded for their lack of action, not only by the National Rifle Association but by their constituents, who will re-elect them.

Now, on Sunday, November 5, less than a month later, a lone gunman with an assault rifle murdered more than 25 parishioners, including young children, in a Texas church. He’d been bad-conduct discharged from the air force for assaults against his wife and child, spent a year in the brig, and he proudly posted a photo of himself brandishing an assault rifle on his Facebook page. Still, he was able to fill his vehicle with deadly weapons.

I could wait until Congress or the President or the Texas legislature acts, but I feel 100% safe concluding in advance that they won’t do a thing. Other than say they are praying. Or proclaim, as President Trump, has already done, the standard mass-shooting sound loop, It’s too early to talk about gun control. Here are his words: “It isn’t a guns situation but a mental health problem at the highest level. But this isn’t a guns situation. I mean, we could go into it, but it’s a little bit soon to go into it.”

Yes. Just as I predicted — easily, if angrily, predicted. After all, politicians did nothing after the murders of elementary school children, college students, cafeteria diners, movie goers, concert goers, party goers, other church goers. They’ll do nothing now.

Three notes:

As I watched the early reports on CBS, NBC and ABC, I heard not a single word about gun control.

What I did hear was that the first person who was blamed for the murders was a Black American seeking revenge for the earlier murders in a Black church in Tennessee. In fact, that crime and this were committed by armed Caucasians.

And finally, here’s how the Dallas News responded to the politicians’ non-response: https://www.dallasnews.com/opinion/commentary/2017/11/05/talk-gun-control-now-sutherland-springs-will-never-talk

Jules

 

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