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It’s a bold idea.

The concept behind SFMOMA’s new restaurant, in situ, is to work “directly with chefs and restaurants around the world to faithfully execute their recipes.” What this means is that the menu consists of dishes from leading restaurants from countries around the world including Canada, Germany, Japan, Turkey, Spain and the USA.

It’s not unusual to respond to a piece of modern art with the question, “What is that?” It is unusual to respond to the dishes on a menu with the same question. For example, while The Forest from France ($28) does, indeed, look like a forest floor and not something one usually eats, it consists of quinoa risotto, mushrooms, and clusters of noofa-looking, edible but tasteless “parsley moss.” The Lamb Shank Manti (Turkey, $22) includes tomato, smoked yogurt, and sumac and bears no visual relation to a lamb shank. The Jasper Hill Farm “Cheesecake” from Spain is a replica of a tiny round of cheese with a tan skin. It tastes pretty much like a super-soft, mild brie. And it costs $22.

Each dish is designated with a symbol indicating portion size: small, medium, or large. The large symbol could be eliminated as all the dishes are small or, at best, medium. The prices, on the other hand, could be designated large. A tiny portion of marinated salmon will set you back $28.

SFMOMA is the home of cutting-edge art, where stretching creativity and imagination are nurtured. In creating in situ, the museum continues its mission of innovation and vision, this time in the kitchen.

And that would be fine, but for two things: Price. And portion. Their inverse relationship dulls that cutting edge.

 

 

 

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Dear, dear Joker, I am far from certain that this is the correct item to send on Mother’s Day. If not, blame Canada.

I know it may offend you. For this I apologize and, of course, blame Canada.

Not only is it in dubious taste, but it’s an advertisement for a commercial product.

Again, blame Canada … and Joker Dave Fonda who lives deep in the heart of Quebec, Canada.

Heinz

This is an actual commercial shown in Europe. Can you imagine what would happen if shown on TV in the US?

https://videosift.com/video/He inz-Handjob

 

Enjoy your ketchup. Oh, and Happy Mother’s Day.

 

Joker Jules

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Brother, where you been?

 

I’ve been hiding. I’ve been hibernating. I’ve been AWOL. And most of all, I’ve been ebbing.

It’s my long-held belief that for the sake of sanity, activists need to ebb and flow. And since this awful election, I’ve been in almost full ebb. Why? Two reasons:

  1. For my mental health.
  2. Because I feel the time’s not yet right for the resistance to begin.

While I and most folks who read this are aghast at Trump’s attacking the free press, cutting off funds to science, silencing dissent, and lying through his grimacing teeth, these aren’t the things that will roll back the tsunami of stupid that got him elected.

The rollback will come when the lies become too obvious for all but the truest believers to ignore, when the cruelty becomes too painful for all but the most heartless to scorn, when the consequences of xenophobic policies become too impoverishing to overlook.

I think all three are just beginning to happen.

Responding to the lies.

http://cnn.it/2q3WsSc              Southern Black students turn their backs

And http://wapo.st/2qV11Pm    Russian scandal becomes Truth scandal

And http://wapo.st/2q52gtZ      Soviet-style disappearing act

Feeling the cruelty

http://cbsn.ws/2pkXrZT           A must-see 60 Minutes segment

Going broke

http://lat.ms/2mDzJaS              Farmers can’t find help for harvest

And http://bit.ly/2m2YzUg       Tourism “fallen off a cliff”

So, do I think the time for resistance is nigh?

No. But I feel the first real stirrings. And a change in the tide.

Jules

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It’s a side of San Francisco that locals know well but visitors often miss. No, not the ethnic neighborhoods the Olders are so fond of — the Golden Triangle.

Golden Triangle? Around 1915, that used to be Market, Powell and Sutter Streets, downtown. Today, it’s Chestnut, Union and Fillmore, in Cow Hollow and the Marina. What makes it golden? Boutique clothing shops. Hip bars and swinging clubs. A multitude of restaurants. And the young, affluent and/or aspiring, smart and/or pretty denizens of the Golden Triangle who live and shop, flirt and eat here.

Many consider the corner of Chestnut and Fillmore the vertex of the triangle. And here, at 2001 Chestnut Street, a couple of short blocks from the Marina’s Apple Store, sits The Dorian.

The best time to dine with the locals is brunch. Which means Saturday or Sunday, from eleven to three. Bring time and an appetite.

Time because the kitchen plays constant catch-up with the crowds. Your food will come but not right away. The wait-staff is cheerful and enthusiastic, but they’re playing catch-up, too. This, the price of popularity.

In addition to a few outside tables on Chestnut, The Dorian has several rooms and corners, plus a busy, eat-at bar. It’s loud but not deafening, quirky but not bizarre. And the food is tasty and plentiful. Definitely worth the wait.

The Chef’s Favorite is the $16 #Yolklife Sando. (That hashtag is your reminder that you’re in Digital Age San Francisco.) It’s an enormous sandwich whose ingredients include a sunny-side egg, Hobb’s sausage, bacon jam, fried green tomato, aged cheddar, chorizo and aioli. Unless you have the appetite of a hungry ape, best share it.

The $13 spring market salad is nearly as large. Add six or seven dollars to top it with generous portions of chicken or shrimp. And maybe order the truffle fries to balance all that green.

The small dessert menu includes a $9 butterscotch bread pudding that’s moist and sweet but not cloyingly sweet.

The OJ tastes fresh; the coffee is disappointing — weak and warm. There are, of course, artisanal drinks (you’re in San Francisco), oysters (ditto), pancakes and grits. Enjoy the food; enjoy the scene. Welcome to the Golden Triangle 2.0

 

The Dorian. 2001 Chestnut Street, at Fillmore. Dinner served Tuesday-Sunday, brunch Saturday and Sunday. www.doriansf.com. Reservations via the website, through www.OpenTable.com and (415) 814-2671.

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